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Taste of Home live cooking show coming to Auburn

Demonstrations, vendor booths and giveaways at event
By: Leah Rosasco, Journal Correspondent
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Taste of Home

What: Cooking demonstration featuring affordable meals with readily available ingredients

When: 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 23. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Where: Gold Country Fairgrounds, 1273 High St., Auburn

Cost: $15 General seating, $20 Reserved seating, $50 VIP seating

Information: (530) 852-0222 or (916) 774-7988, or via email at

Tickets are available at the Auburn Journal, Roseville Press-Tribune, Lincoln News Messenger, Colfax Record, Loomis News, Placer Herald and Folsom Telegraph offices.

A culinary magazine featuring readers’ recipes will bring its cooking road show to Auburn this fall. As part of its fall tour the Taste of Home Cooking School will make a stop at the Gold Country Fairgrounds Oct. 23 to share tips and tricks to making family meals with readily available ingredients.

According to Kristi Larson, Taste of Home culinary specialist, the two-hour cooking demonstration will feature the preparation of 10 dishes, several of which were created by Taste of Home magazine readers.

“Our recipes come from subscribers and then we run them through our test kitchen and make any adjustments that are needed,” Larson said.

The focus of the Taste of Home Cooking School is to show people how to make affordable meals for every day and holidays, regardless of skill level. According to Larson, what makes the Taste of Home event unique is the fact that the recipes were developed by everyday people who are cooking for their own families in their own homes.

“It is really about bringing people and families together and creating memories,” Larson said.

Larson said she will be preparing a variety of dishes at the Auburn Taste of Home Cooking School, including an upside down apple cake, several bruschetta recipes, pineapple chicken salad, cinnamon rolls and more.

“The recipes we showcase change with the seasons,” Larson said. “Because we focus on readily available ingredients the food we cook in the fall is different from what we cook in the spring.”

Although doors open at 4:30 p.m. a number of local businesses will host booths outside the event beginning at 3 p.m. Vendors will offer food, housewares, wine tasting, and cookbooks for sale. Once the doors open, ticket holders will be able to visit additional booths sponsored by national and local event sponsors.

One of several restaurants that will be on hand to sell food outside the event is Flying Pig BBQ, which, according to owner George Miller, will offer a “slider-type sandwich.” As a “foodie” Miller said he is looking forward to the presentation and he is happy to see an event of this magnitude in Auburn.

“It’s a food event so it’s interesting to me,” he said.

Although he owns his own restaurant, Miller said he plans to pay attention while he is there. “I might learn something new,” he said. “I can always learn something new.”

According to Linda Shuman-Prins, of Gold Country Media, which is sponsoring the event, the Taste of Home Cooking School will likely be a big draw in the Auburn area.

“We anticipate people will be there at noon,” Shuman-Prins said.

Auburn Journal Publisher Todd Frantz added that he thinks area residents will enjoy an evening where they can pick up tips and tricks for their everyday meals and perhaps some extra ideas for the holidays.

“Taste of Home magazine reaches tens of thousands of readers in our region so we’re happy to bring the recipes and tips readers like seeing in the magazine to life with this live cooking show,” Frantz said. “We’re also pleased we can include our local businesses and eateries into the mix.”

In addition to the cooking demonstration, ticket holders will receive a “goody bag” with a Taste of Home magazine, samples, and coupons, among other items, and there will be prize giveaways with items from local businesses and national sponsors.

According to Larson, among the favorite prizes are the 10 dishes that are featured during the demonstration.

“People get to take home finished food, which is really nice,” Larson said.